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Cybersecurity Skills Gap: What Your Company Can Do


What is the cybersecurity skills gap and what can your company do about it? Certain ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic will be seared in our minds forever—supply chain disruptions, workforce shortages, and a major shift to virtual work and education. One major effect of the pandemic, though lesser known, is being felt by I.T. departments in thousands of businesses across the globe.

The threat of increasingly sophisticated cybercriminals is more imminent now than ever as the body of smart devices in the Internet of Things grows and as government agencies, healthcare giants, and academic institutions move to digital, work-from-home infrastructure, increasing their vulnerability to cyberattacks that could leave the private information of their employees, clients, and stakeholders exposed.

To add to the concern, there's a major skills gap in cybersecurity and it's only expected to grow. Experts predict 3.5 million job openings in cybersecurity by 2025. This cybersecurity skills gap is what prompted Microsoft to launch an international skilling campaign to help the world's businesses fight off ever-advanced cyberattacks. With increasing technical demands and a shortage of qualified workers, it's clear that the one thing organizations should do to stay ahead of cybersecurity threats is invest in high-quality training and certification programs. 

Comply To Connect - The Pentagon's Defense Against Cyber Attacks

By 2025, it is estimated that there will be at least 75 billion connected devices in what is being called the “Internet of Things” (IoT). With advances in microprocessors, sensing devices, and software, pretty soon anything that can be connected will be connected.

Here's What You Need to Remember: Seven years ago, the DoD created Comply to Connect (C2C) as a way to secure its growing array of network endpoints.

The proliferation of devices on the Internet is becoming a tidal wave. In addition to your phone, computer, video game console, and television, the Internet now connects practically everything that has electronics and sensors: household appliances, heating, and air conditioning systems, cars, airplanes, ships, industrial robots, public utilities, home security systems, children’s toys, and medical devices.

Things That Make Computer Experts Squirm

Things that make computer experts squirm

Stop Cyberattacks: 4 Keys to Securing Your Remote Workforce

The pandemic taught workers around the globe that business as usual can continue, even with a remote workforce, and many of us would like to continue telecommuting. A Boston Consulting Group survey reveals that homeworking is here to stay, with 89% of workers expecting to continue working at home after the crisis ends. While some employees will be required to go back to businesses' physical locations, some will willingly work remotely. Regardless, the hybrid work environment creates unique security challenges for IT teams.

Ethical Hacker Vs. Penetration Tester

Comparing Ethical Hackers to Penetration Testers

Ethical hackers and penetration testers both work in corporate settings, where they apply their knowledge of computing networks and systems security to prevent security breaches. Penetration testers may work as part of an IT team as they oversee all sides of network security. Ethical hackers use their hacking smarts to prevent the not-so-ethical hackers from attacking the system. Other similarities and differences are discussed below.

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